Gardening

Curiosities for vegetable garden


A plant that gives tomatoes and potatoes, strawberries with the taste of raspberries ...

Review of the astonishing plants of the season with Marc Gueguen, R&D manager at Truffaut.

Surprising hybrids

Hybridization is an art practiced by enthusiasts all over the world. Presented at international exhibitions, their creations, obtained after years of research, aim to improve a culture, in terms of resistance and productivity, and also to surprise and amaze!

Thus, astonishment is guaranteed in front of the Tomtato, graft between a tomato plant and a potato plant, the branches of which give tomatoes in summer and the roots of potatoes in autumn.

On double-grafted tomato plants, this is the productivity that is improved, with plants that give twice as much fruit, or that produce two different varieties! Knowing that if the grafted plants are more expensive to buy than the seedlings - since they are grafted manually - they show themselves more resistant to the climatic hazards of the North of the Loire. Ditto for grafted basil, which can thus survive the cold snap of these regions.

Rediscovered varieties

A time forgotten, many varieties are rediscovered and appreciated for their resistance or their taste. This is the case with the Framberry®, a strawberry popular with top chefs and pastry chefs for its two-in-one flavor, strawberry and raspberry. Abandoned in favor of hybrid strawberries with a longer shelf life, it finds a second life in vegetable gardens where it can be picked just before consumption. One way to fight against the standardization of tastes.

Also popular with cooks, the mertensia maritima comes to us from the Breton coast, where it has almost disappeared. Its particularity: its gray-green leaves have the scent and taste of oyster.

They are eaten on grilled toast, with salted butter, or on skewers with shrimp, a la plancha. Something to amaze your guests!

Laure Hamann

Visual credits:Truffaut, ┬ę eyewave

Video: How To Start A Vegetable Garden. Central Florida Gardening 101 for Self Sufficiency (October 2020).