Garden flowers

The peony, a flower made to last


Many flowers have long been popular in gardens.

They have the merit of being robust and sometimes passed from generation to generation. Like the peony.

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  • Benefits, virtues of peony
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The peony: a flower made to last

The peony, a plant that is sometimes a little difficult but full of charm, often survives the person who planted it and the older clumps still produce copious amounts of flowers in late spring. This plant owes its longevity to its deep roots which guarantee it against the vagaries of the climate.

Peonies are hardy. This frost resistance theoretically allows them to be planted all winter. However, since flowering is in the spring (March to June), it is best to plant in the fall, which will give the roots time to develop properly.

To propagate it, it suffices to take a piece of the stump with a few leaves in September, like cutting a quarter of a pie.

Peonies appreciate the sun, but not the scorching exposures.

The soil should be deep, rich and well drained. If your soil is hard, loosen it by working it with a spade. If your soil is a little poor, add organic matter (horse manure, dried blood, etc.).

Peonies are very complementary to climbing roses, of which they dress the base, and whose roses take over from flowering during summer.

There are two types of peonies on the market: shrub or herbaceous. As their name suggests, tree peonies can normally form true shrubs. But they do turn out to be a bit finicky, and their growth is frustratingly slow! On the other hand, take your pick from the thousands of herbaceous peony hybrids, which already form beautiful flowering clumps in a reasonable amount of time.

  • Gardening: how to grow peony well
  • Health: benefits and virtues of peony
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Video: How to Make a Felted Wool Flower Tutorial - Peony (November 2020).